Growing Calamondin Citrus Tree

With its glossy-green foliage and abundant, golden fruit, this  citrus tree is a great starter plant.  If you’re new to growing citrus trees as houseplants, I highly recommend starting with an indoor/ patio-tolerant Calamondin Orange. Small but abundant, bright-orange fruits appear at regular intervals on this cross between a Kumquat and Mandarin Orange. Calamondin oranges are quite tart and a good substitute for Persian limes in most recipes. Their tangy juice and sweet zest is delicious in many drinks, desserts, & savory dishes.

When potting your newly acquired citrus tree, choose a ceramic, clay or plastic pot with adequate drainage. Ensure that the selected container has several holes at the bottom, and fill the drainage dish with gravel or stone to allow good moisture release and airflow. Well-drained soil is also critical. Buy pre-mixed potting soil and mix with compost to give it more nutrients. 

Citrus trees need 8-12 hours of sunlight per day. During the fall and winter months, place your Calamondin in a draft-free, south-facing window with even temperatures (55-85Β°F is ideal). Avoid locating the tree where temperatures fluctuate radically: such as near wood stoves, ovens, radiators or exterior doors. Calamondin Orange Trees may be moved outside in late spring (after the last frost date in your area). Be sure to slowly acclimate your tree to outdoor conditions by placing it in a protected spot.

Water your tree regularly and cover the soil with  mulch to help reduce evaporation and temperature fluctuation at the root zone. Soil should be kept on the drier side during winter months to avoid root rot and fungal infections. Like most tropical beauties, Calamondins enjoy humidifiers and/or regular misting as well.

Calamondin oranges take about one year to ripen from the time blossoms appear. However, because the tree will produce flowers and fruit at the same time, harvests can happen over a period of weeks or months. Snip bright orange fruit from branches with sharp snips to avoid tearing the tender skin. You’ll know the oranges are ripe when they are just soft enough to give slightly under the pressure of your fingertips.

With proper attention and care, a Calamondin Orange Tree will provide many golden harvests of fruit and years of beauty, inside and out.

Published by Our new blog name The-dirty-hoe.com

I am a mother, wife, and artist. My true passions are art,environmental awareness, and gardening. I have an Etsy shop where you can find my products are all designed and created by me,help of my computer program, and my 3D printer creating a one of a kind design for your home or office.I am inspired by nature every day and being blessed by living near the ocean gives me the opportunity to find inspiration to bring into my shop and my blog posts.I try to be creative in my designs and I love sharing tips and new ideas in my blogs.

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