Bluebonnet

Did you know that there are actually six native species of bluebonnet that grow in Texas and that all six of them are collectively classified as Texas’ state flower? There’s Lupinus texensis, of course, which is the bluebonnet that we all know and love. However, according to the Native Plant Society, Texas is also home to four other species: Lupinus subcarnosus, Lupinus Havardii, Lupinus concinnus, Lupinus perennis, and Lupinus plattensis

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Texas bluebonnets are annual plants, meaning they go from seed to flower to seed in one year. They germinate in the fall and grow throughout the winter, and usually bloom around the end of March to the mid-May. Around mid-May, they form a seedpod, which is green at first but turns yellow and then brown.

Texas bluebonnets are adapted to the rocky, alkaline soils of the Hill Country  and to its frequent droughts. In fact, they thrive in heavily disturbed, poor soils and full sun.  As for watering your bluebonnets, if possible, using light, well-spaced waterings. Although bluebonnets require some moisture to germinate and grow, they do not like saturated soil. If fall or winter rainfall is low, an occasional watering will help ensure success.  As you know nature always has a way of surprising us. Just when you think you have something figured out, nature throws you for a loop every time. For example, bluebonnets are quite simply blue and white flowers, correct? Wrong. Most bluebonnets are blue and white, but the flowers actually come in varying shades of pink, purple, and white as well! 

We will be adding more blogs about this beautiful Texan flower next week!

Published by Our new blog name The-dirty-hoe.com

I am a mother, wife, and artist. My true passions are art,environmental awareness, and gardening. I have an Etsy shop where you can find my products are all designed and created by me,help of my computer program, and my 3D printer creating a one of a kind design for your home or office.I am inspired by nature every day and being blessed by living near the ocean gives me the opportunity to find inspiration to bring into my shop and my blog posts.I try to be creative in my designs and I love sharing tips and new ideas in my blogs.

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